Doug Koshland

Doug Koshland

Professor of Genetics, Genomics and Development
University of California Berkeley

Eric C. Greene

Eric Greene

Professor, Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biophysics
Columbia University Medical Center

Daniel Durocher

Daniel Durocher

Professor
University of Toronto

Dr. Doug Koshland, Ph.D.  is currently the Richard and Rhoda Goldman Distinguished Chair in the Biological Sciences & Professor of Genetics, Genomics and Development in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Koshland is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, of the American Academy of Microbiology, of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Dr. Koshland has been a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator, and has been named a Lifetime Achievement Fellow by American Society for Cell Biology. Dr. Koshland’s laboratory uses budding yeast to inform on fundamental processes in cell biology, including cell division, chromosome segregation, higher order chromosome structure, and genome evolution. Dr. Koshland’s approach has been to use genetic, molecular biological, biochemical, and cell biological approaches to develop novel reagents and methods to analyze these complex processes in vivo and in vitro. Together these approaches have allowed us to make significant contributions to each of these areas of research. Dr. Koshland have trained and mentored a diverse group of undergraduate, graduate and postdoctoral fellows throughout his career.

Dr. Eric Greene, Ph.D  is a Professor in the Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biophysics at Columbia University. Dr. Greene’s laboratory pioneered development of novel technologies for studying protein–nucleic acid interactions at the single–molecule level using real–time optical microscopy with the goal to understand the molecular mechanisms governing DNA repair, as well as mechanisms that cells use to maintain, and decode their genetic information. Dr. Greene’s lab combines biochemistry, physics, and nanoscale technology with a goal to understand fundamental interactions between proteins and nucleic acids, as well as to address other complex biological problems. The goal of Greene’s lab is to visualize proteins bound to DNA, to determine where they are bound, how they move, and how they interact. Using these approaches, the Greene laboratory successfully investigated the mechanisms of DNA repair and of homologous DNA recombination, mechanisms of how condensing complexes contribute to higher-order chromosome organization, mechanisms of how CRISPR systems locate specific DNA target site sites. Dr. Greene was the recipient of the March of Dimes Basil O’Connor Starter Scholar Research Award, of the Breast Cancer Alliance Young Investigator Award, of the Irma T. Hirschl and Monique Weill-Caulier Career Scientist Award and of the Doctor Harold and Golden Lamport Research Award in Basic Sciences. Dr. Greene was selected by the National Science Foundation to receive a 2007 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) and in 2009 he received an Early Career Scientist Award from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

Dr. Daniel Durocher, Ph.D. FRSC is a Senior Investigator and a Biomedical Program Director at the Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute. He is also a Professor in the Department of Molecular Genetics at the University of Toronto. Dr. Durocher’s overarching interest lies in understanding how cells maintain genome integrity, with an emphasis on the detection, signaling and repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Dr. Durocher’s lab is using genetic, biochemical, functional genomic and proteomic approaches as well as collaborating with structural biologists, computational biologists and mouse geneticists to achieve these goals. Dr. Durocher’s discoveries have included the finding of a critical switch for ending a DNA repair response, the biology of chromosome rearrangements and the regulation of chromosome caps or ‘telomeres’ in cells. All these findings have shed important light on the process by which normal cells become cancerous. Dr. Durocher is also keenly interested in exploiting the concept of synthetic lethality for cancer therapy and as part of these efforts, he co-founded Repare Therapeutics, an early-state drug development company aiming to develop new drugs based on this idea. Among the prizes, awards and honors received by Dr. Durocher in recent years, particularly notable is the 2016 Paul Marks Prize for cancer research awarded by Memorial Sloan Kettering.